Travel New England

#9
Appalachian Trail (AT)
The most hiked long trail in the US is the 2,200 mile (3,500 km) Appalachian Trail that runs north from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Mount Katahdin in Maine. The trail runs through five of the six New England states (all but coastal RI). More than 2 million people are said to take a hike on part of the trail at least once each year. It's most rigorous section is within the White Mountain National Forest located in New Hampshire. For northbound thru-hikers (full length), it is the beginning of the main challenges that go beyond enduring distance and time: in New Hampshire and Maine, rough or steep ground are more frequent and alpine conditions are found near summits and along ridges. The trail reaches 17 of the 48 four-thousand footers of New Hampshire, including 6,288-foot (1,917 m) Mount Washington, the highest point of the AT north of Tennessee and most topographically prominent peak in eastern North America.

Link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_Trail

Appalachian Mountains
The Appalachian Mountains, often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern North America. The Appalachians first formed roughly 480 million years ago during the Ordovician Period. They once reached elevations similar to those of the Alps and the Rocky Mountains before experiencing natural erosion. The Appalachian chain is a barrier to east–west travel, as it forms a series of alternating ridgelines and valleys oriented in opposition to most highways and railroads running east–west.

The mountain range is mostly in the United States (U.S.) but it extends into southeastern Canada, forming a zone from 100 to 300 mi (160 to 480 km) wide, running from the island of Newfoundland 1,500 mi (2,400 km) southwestward to central Alabama in the United States. The highest elevation of the group is Mount Mitchell in North Carolina at 6,684 feet (2,037 m), which is the highest point in the United States east of the Mississippi River.

Link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_Mountains
 
#10
I think one of the best aspects of New England is the great variation it has within its six states.

It has sandy beaches and rocky coastline along its 6,000 mile tidal shoreline. It has mountains with summits reaching over 6,000 feet in ranges such as the White Mountains of New Hampshire and Green Mountains of Vermont. It has rivers, rolling hills, and farmland along its interior. It has islands such as Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket, and Block Island off its Atlantic coast. It has deep temperate forests along its northern border with Canada. The region’s landscape offers so many variations to enjoy with none of it being more than a few hours drive away.

New England also offers contrasts in its human scale. It has a world class city in Boston offering all the amenities of urban life. It also has several smaller mid-sized cities such as Providence, Hartford, Worcester, and New Haven. At the other end of the spectrum, New England is also dotted by small villages and hamlets surrounded by large swaths of undeveloped lands in its interior and northern fringes.

The weather is ever changing in New England with four very pronounced and different seasons. There are cold snowy winters ideal for downhill skiing, skating, snowmobiling, ice fishing, and x-country skiing. There are magnificent springs where nature comes alive again each year returning a canopy of green. Warm summers provide ocean and lake swimming, sailing, surfing, and boating. The Fall, often also called Autumn, brings about cooler temperatures and one of the most vivid displays of colors (with the leaves of the trees changing hue) in the world.

New England offers quite a bit in such a small space.
 
#12
As I mentioned a while ago, I pass all your posts onto travel agents. It would be nice if you got a commission.

I don't mind sharing the info. I have a friend that does travel and is a guide for tours. She is always telling me that I need to make a career change from accounting/finance systems and operations to tourism. She says I am a natural.
 
#15
Waterfire - Downtown Providence, Rhode Island's signature event held multiple times throughout the warmer weather months.








Waterfire Wiki Link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WaterFire

WaterFire is simultaneously a free public art installation, a performance work, an urban festival, a civic ritual, and a spiritual communal ceremony, well known nationally and internationally as a community arts event. On WaterFire evenings, downtown Providence is transformed by eighty six anchored burning braziers (each with approximately 33 pieces of wood) that float just above the surface of the rivers that flow through Waterplace Park (the Woonasquatucket river) and the middle of downtown Providence (the Moshassuck and Providence rivers). The public is invited to come and walk the riverfront and enjoy the beauty of the flickering firelight, the fragrant scent of aromatic wood smoke, the changing silhouettes of the volunteer firetenders, and the music from around the world. Average attendance is 40,000 a night, ranging from 10,000 to 100,000.




Waterfire Official Site Link:
https://waterfire.org/
 
#17
I've kept up with this thread and we decided that we (the family) will pay a visit during the 2020 celebrations. We visited a travel agent and he knew all about it and was very helpful.
So Plymouth here we come.
 
#20
Newport, RI Mansions and Other Attractions
(60 miles from Plymouth, MA)

While the UK certainly has its share of castles and palatial country manor houses, it likely does not have what Newport provides in a small one square mile space along Bellevue Avenue. In the latter part of the 19th century during a period known as the Gilded Age, the wealthy industrialists from across America flocked to Newport for its summer season social scene. Families such as the Vanderbilts and Astors competed with one another to build the grandest summer "cottage" which was used just a few weeks of each year. Most of these homes had large ballrooms where they hosted lavish parties. Many sports from the UK such as tennis, golf, and yachting made their American debut in the city as it hosted some of the first US Opens (both golf and tennis) and yachting races later becoming the longtime home to the America's Cup races. Many of the homes and leisure spots from then still exist to this day with several still open to the public (many of the homes are also still private residences). Several of the homes front the ocean and can be viewed along the public Cliff Walk.

The Breakers



The Marble House



The Elms



Rosecliff



Rough Point



Ochre Court


Newport Casino & International Tennis Hall of Fame



Newport Country Club (ocean views)


America's Cup Trials (2017)
 

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