How the Hell is this done?

Smithers

Junior Member
#2
I watched that 3 times and I can't see how it works, magic really does exist.
So if he now cut it up again would he have a second square left over.
 

Roy

Junior Member
#4
Asked my nephew in Australia, and this was his answer.
It’s all about the angle cut and moving the piece on the left to replace the piece on the right. By doing this you reduce the area (blocks) by a row.
The original rows was 8, by moving the left side to the right, it reduces the rows to 7.

So now you know.!!
Anything else you want to know??
 
#5
But we counted the rows at the start and there are 8 x 5
We counted the rows at the end and there are still 8 x 5

If it reduced the rows to 7 then there would be a whole row left over and not just one square so ???????
 

Alan

And me from Sweden
#8
Its mass versus area. The piece left over if cut correctly would fill out the smaller squares and make it a perfect mass again. The way to test this is to draw an 8x5 grid then cut it out and you will see what I mean.
 
#9
Call me thick or stupid or whatever, but that doesn't explain how the piece left over is a whole square.
If the other squares were smaller, there would be bits left over and not a whole square.
 

Alan

And me from Sweden
#10
Because it was cut out as a square, if you cut a diagonal line through something then you can alter the overall lenght by sliding along the diagonal. The rest was cut it a fashion to fill the rectangle and make it look complete with one square over. Try it with a piece of graph paper and you will get a better understanding of it.
 
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